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Preferentialism in Trade Relations: Challenges for the World Trade Organization

dc.contributor.authorPatrick Low
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-10T10:17:40Z
dc.date.available2015-04-10T10:17:40Z
dc.date.issued2014-05-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11540/4009
dc.description.abstractThis paper argues that preferential trade agreements (PTAs) and the World Trade Organization (WTO) are not substitutes, and while PTAs are without doubt here to stay, dispensing with a multilateral venue for doing business in trade matters is not a serious option. It is therefore necessary to seek out better accommodation between PTAs and the WTO than has been apparent to date. The law of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)/WTO has systematically fallen short in imposing discipline on discriminatory reciprocal trade agreements, while procedural requirements, such as notifications, have been partially observed at best, and dispute settlement findings have tended to reinforce existing weaknesses in the disciplines. One approach to remedying this situation is to explore a different kind of cooperation—that of soft law. A soft law approach to improving coherence and compatibility between the WTO and PTAs may hold some promise, but the option also has its pitfalls.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAsian Development Bank
dc.rightsCC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
dc.titlePreferentialism in Trade Relations: Challenges for the World Trade Organization
dc.typeWorking Papers
dc.subject.expertTrade Finance
dc.subject.expertRural Finance
dc.subject.expertRegional Development Finance
dc.subject.expertPublic Financial Management
dc.subject.expertPublic Finance
dc.subject.expertInternational Finance
dc.subject.expertIntergovernmental Finance
dc.subject.expertFinancial System
dc.subject.expertFinancial Flows
dc.subject.expertFinancial Assets
dc.subject.expertFinance And Trade
dc.subject.expertTrade Finance
dc.subject.adbLocal Finance
dc.subject.adbInternational Monetary Relations
dc.subject.adbLocal Finance
dc.subject.adbBanks
dc.subject.adbCapital Market
dc.subject.adbfinancial statistics
dc.subject.adbForeign trade
dc.subject.naturalMunicipal government
dc.subject.naturalMetropolitan government
dc.subject.naturalInternational banks and banking
dc.subject.naturalCapital movements
dc.subject.naturalCentral banks and banking
dc.subject.naturalBills of exchange
dc.subject.naturalSwaps
dc.subject.naturalBanks and banking
dc.subject.naturalStock exchanges
dc.subject.naturalMarket
dc.subject.naturalExchange
dc.subject.naturalBalance of trade
dc.title.seriesADBI Working Paper Series
dc.title.volume478
dc.contributor.imprintAsian Development Bank
oar.themeFinance
oar.themeTrade
oar.adminregionAsia and the Pacific Region
oar.countryBangladesh
oar.countryBhutan
oar.countryIndia
oar.countryMaldives
oar.countryNepal
oar.countrySri Lanka
oar.countryBrunei Darussalam
oar.countryCambodia
oar.countryIndonesia
oar.countryLao People's Democratic
oar.countryMalaysia
oar.countryMyanmar
oar.countryPhilippines
oar.countrySingapore
oar.countryThailand
oar.countryViet Nam
oar.countryCook Islands
oar.countryFiji Islands
oar.countryKiribati
oar.countryMarshall Islands
oar.countryFederated States of Micronesia
oar.countryNauru
oar.countryPalau
oar.countryPapua New Guinea
oar.countrySamoa
oar.countrySolomon Islands
oar.countryTimor-Leste
oar.countryTonga
oar.countryTuvalu
oar.countryVanuatu
oar.countryAfghanistan
oar.countryArmenia
oar.countryAzerbaijan
oar.countryGeorgia
oar.countryKazakhstan
oar.countryKyrgyz Republic
oar.countryPakistan
oar.countryTajikistan
oar.countryTurkmenistan
oar.countryUzbekistan
oar.countryPeople's Republic of China
oar.countryHong Kong
oar.countryChina
oar.countryRepublic of Korea
oar.countryMongolia
oar.countryTaipei,China
oar.identifierOAR-003997
oar.authorLow, Patrick
oar.importtrue
oar.googlescholar.linkpresenttrue


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    The Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) Working Paper series is a continuation of the formerly named Discussion Paper series which began in January 2003. The numbering of the papers continued without interruption or change. ADBI was established in 1997 in Tokyo, Japan, to help build capacity, skills, and knowledge related to poverty reduction and other areas that support long-term growth and competitiveness in developing economies in Asia and the Pacific.

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