Show simple item record

Understanding the Pattern of Growth and Equity in the People's Republic of China

dc.contributor.authorMinquan Liu
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-10T10:17:21Z
dc.date.available2015-04-10T10:17:21Z
dc.date.issued2011-12-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11540/3919
dc.description.abstractThere are likely to be many factors which have together shaped the current pattern of growth and equity in the People’s Republic of China (PRC). Among them are the foundations laid in the pre-1978 era, especially in respect of land-related institutional reforms and social sector investments. These factors successfully complemented the subsequent export and foreign direct investment promotion strategies the PRC followed in the post-1978 years. However, given the large size of the PRC, while these strategies have helped to kick-start its economic take-off, the long-run growth of the country cannot depend on it. It will be important for the PRC in the forthcoming decades to expand its own domestic demand and renew social sector investments. Among other things, it will need to improve on its current income distributions. In particular, as well as wage increases, it will be important for the PRC to expand its social protection programs. This will help not only to boost its domestic demand, but also, more importantly, to contribute to a renewal and expansion of its human capital accumulation. In the long run, there is nothing more important than this if the PRC is to continue on its growth track, to modernize, and to catch up with today’s developed nations. Superior pre-1978 human capital accumulations have helped the PRC to compete with and outperform other similarly positioned economies in the decades before; continued growth of the economy and continued improvements of the living standards of its people in the forthcoming decades will require vast amounts of new investment in human capital. And to this, increased investments by the government, whether through direct spending or increased levels of social protection, may well prove to be of special importance.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAsian Development Bank
dc.rightsCC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
dc.titleUnderstanding the Pattern of Growth and Equity in the People's Republic of China
dc.typeWorking Papers
dc.subject.expertPublic Sector Wages
dc.subject.expertEquity In Education
dc.subject.expertEducational Programs
dc.subject.adbWage earners
dc.subject.adbWage payment systems
dc.subject.adbVocational training
dc.subject.adbTraining
dc.subject.naturalWage differentials
dc.subject.naturalWages and labor productivity
dc.subject.naturalOccupational training
dc.subject.naturalManual training
dc.title.seriesADBI Working Paper Series
dc.title.volume331
dc.contributor.imprintAsian Development Bank
oar.themePublic Sector
oar.themeEducation
oar.themeLabor Migration
oar.adminregionEast Asia Region
oar.countryPeople's Republic of China
oar.identifierOAR-004056
oar.authorLiu, Minquan
oar.importtrue
oar.googlescholar.linkpresenttrue


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • ADBI Working Papers
    The Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) Working Paper series is a continuation of the formerly named Discussion Paper series which began in January 2003. The numbering of the papers continued without interruption or change. ADBI was established in 1997 in Tokyo, Japan, to help build capacity, skills, and knowledge related to poverty reduction and other areas that support long-term growth and competitiveness in developing economies in Asia and the Pacific.

Show simple item record

Users also downloaded