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Regulatory Framework and Role of Domestic Credit Rating Agencies in Bangladesh

dc.contributor.authorJiro Tsunoda
dc.contributor.authorMuzaffar Ahmed
dc.contributor.authorMohammed Tajul Islam
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-06T15:56:20Z
dc.date.available2015-02-06T15:56:20Z
dc.date.issued2013-11-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11540/2293
dc.description.abstractThe Securities and Exchange Commission Bangladesh (SECB) promulgated the Credit Rating Companies Rules, 1996 for investor protection in issuing debt securities and public issue of shares. Two domestic credit rating agencies (DCRAs) were licensed by SECB after 2002, which were later accorded status of external credit assessment institutions (ECAIs) by Bangladesh Bank. Thereafter, SECB and Bangladesh Bank issued rules and regulations towards mandatory ratings which led to the building of information frameworks critical to the efficiency of financial markets. Investors could now optimize their risk–return profiles, monitor their portfolios through regular surveillance and credit rating adjustments, and have timely information for trading and risk management. Recently, DCRAs have come to play a more crucial role since the capital adequacy of commercial banks has been tied to rating assessment of bank investments. The use of credit rating is expected to lead to the establishment of acceptable measures of credit risk evaluation so that commercial banks can meet Basel II regulatory prescriptions. As Bangladesh Bank accords ECAI status to more DCRAs, banking sector financing to corporate borrowers is receiving a boost. The number of DCRAs operational in Bangladesh has risen from two to seven between 2010 and 2013. Furthermore, Bangladesh Bank plans to introduce ratings for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and a customized credit assessment framework for SMEs including a separate rating scale and notation that sets SME ratings apart from the usual bank loan ratings. Access to adequate financing is still a chronic problem for SMEs in the Asian region and here, credit ratings could fill a critical gap in the credit information continuum, moving away from collateral-based lending to risk-based lending.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAsian Development Bank
dc.rightsCC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
dc.titleRegulatory Framework and Role of Domestic Credit Rating Agencies in Bangladesh
dc.typeWorking Papers
dc.subject.expertAsian Development Bank
dc.subject.expertDevelopment
dc.subject.expertRegional Economic Integration
dc.subject.expertFinancial Sector Policies
dc.subject.expertFinancial Risk Management
dc.subject.expertBond Financing
dc.subject.adbEconomic integration
dc.subject.adbDevelopment Bank
dc.subject.adbCapital Market
dc.subject.adbRegional Plans
dc.subject.adbRegional Development Bank
dc.subject.adbDevelopment finance
dc.subject.naturalDevelopment Banks
dc.subject.naturalLocal government bonds
dc.subject.naturalBonds
dc.subject.naturalCatastrophe bonds
dc.subject.naturalBond funds
dc.subject.naturalBond market
dc.subject.naturalMultilateral development banks
dc.title.seriesSouth Asia Working Papers
dc.title.volumeno 21
dc.contributor.imprintAsian Development Bank
oar.themeFinance
oar.themeRegional
oar.themeLabor Migration
oar.themeSmall Medium Business
oar.adminregionAsia and the Pacific Region
oar.countryBangladesh
oar.identifierOAR-001510
oar.authorTsunoda, Jiro
oar.authorAhmed, Muzaffar
oar.authorIslam, Mohammed Tajul
oar.importtrue
oar.googlescholar.linkpresenttrue


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