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Foundations of Collective Action in Asia: Theory and Practice of Regional Cooperation

dc.contributor.authorAmitav Acharya
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-24T13:12:08Z
dc.date.available2015-01-24T13:12:08Z
dc.date.issued2012-02-14
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11540/1109
dc.description.abstract"This paper argues that the collective action in Asia by its regional organizations has historically suffered from a “capability–legitimacy gap”: a disjuncture between the capability (in terms of material resources) of major Asian powers to lead regional cooperation on the one hand and their political legitimacy and will as regional leaders on the other. Successful collective action requires leadership with both capability (as suggested by rationalist theories) and legitimacy (as suggested by constructivist approaches). A central point of the paper is that the putative or aspiring leaders of Asian regionalism throughout the post-war period never had both. Actors who were materially capable of providing leadership and direction (the United States [US]1 and Japan) have lacked the necessary legitimacy, while those who have possessed legitimacy (India and the People’s Republic of China [PRC])2 in the 1940s and 1950s, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) since 1967, and Indonesia in the context of Asia as a whole) have lacked the necessary resources. The result has been that while the ASEAN-led Asian institutions have made a significant normative contribution to regional order, they have not proved to be effective instruments of regional problem solving. But the capability-legitimacy gap has both costs and benefits. While Asian regional institutions remain weakly institutionalized and attract criticism as “talk-shops,” they have helped to ensure that Asia does not degenerate into a hegemonic order or a concert of power. It remains to be seen whether regionalism in an era of a rising PRC and India could bridge this gap. It is theoretically possible that the PRC and India could develop and possess both the resources and political will and standing to provide collective goods and lead Asian regionalism, but their mutual rivalry might prevent this."
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAsian Development Bank Institute
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/igo/
dc.titleFoundations of Collective Action in Asia: Theory and Practice of Regional Cooperation
dc.typeWorking Papers
dc.subject.expertAsian Development Bank
dc.subject.expertDevelopment
dc.subject.expertRural Development
dc.subject.expertPublic Sector
dc.subject.expertPublic Sector Management
dc.subject.expertDevelopment Cooperation
dc.subject.expertDevelopment Goals
dc.subject.expertOrganization For Economic Cooperation & Development
dc.subject.expertPublic Sector Projects
dc.subject.adbPorts
dc.subject.adbEducation
dc.subject.adbPorts
dc.subject.adbEducation
dc.subject.adbRural planning
dc.subject.adbRegional development bank
dc.subject.adbProject finance
dc.subject.adbStrategic planning
dc.subject.adbInfrastructure projects
dc.subject.adbGovernment programs
dc.subject.adbPublic finance
dc.subject.adbPublic enterprises
dc.subject.naturalInfrastructure
dc.subject.naturalPartnership
dc.subject.naturalPower
dc.subject.naturalCommunication in rural development
dc.subject.naturalRural enterprise zones
dc.subject.naturalCommunication in community development
dc.subject.naturalSocial participation
dc.subject.naturalDevelopment banks
dc.subject.naturalCommunity banks
dc.subject.naturalPartnership
dc.subject.naturalJoint venture
dc.subject.naturalEconomic development
dc.subject.naturalPublic works
dc.subject.naturalAdministrative agencies
dc.title.seriesADBI Working Paper Series
dc.title.volumeNo. 344
dc.contributor.imprintAsian Development Bank Institute
oar.themeDevelopment
oar.themePublic Sector
oar.adminregionAsia and the Pacific Region
oar.countryBangladesh
oar.countryBhutan
oar.countryIndia
oar.countryMaldives
oar.countryNepal
oar.countrySri Lanka
oar.countryBrunei Darussalam
oar.countryCambodia
oar.countryIndonesia
oar.countryLao People's Democratic Republic
oar.countryMalaysia
oar.countryMyanmar
oar.countryPhilippines
oar.countrySingapore
oar.countryThailand
oar.countryViet Nam
oar.countryCook Islands
oar.countryFiji
oar.countryKiribati
oar.countryMarshall Islands
oar.countryMicronesia, Federated States of
oar.countryNauru
oar.countryPalau
oar.countryPapua New Guinea
oar.countrySamoa
oar.countrySolomon Islands
oar.countryTimor-Leste
oar.countryTonga
oar.countryTuvalu
oar.countryVanuatu
oar.countryAfghanistan
oar.countryArmenia
oar.countryAzerbaijan
oar.countryGeorgia
oar.countryKazakhstan
oar.countryKyrgyz Republic
oar.countryPakistan
oar.countryTajikistan
oar.countryTurkmenistan
oar.countryUzbekistan
oar.countryChina, People’s Republic of
oar.countryHong Kong, China
oar.countryChina, People’s Republic of
oar.countryRepublic of Korea
oar.countryMongolia
oar.countryTaipei,China
oar.dep.sourceADBI
oar.identifierOAR-002336
oar.authorAcharya, Amitav
oar.importtrue
oar.googlescholar.linkpresenttrue


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  • ADBI Working Papers
    The Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) Working Paper series is a continuation of the formerly named Discussion Paper series which began in January 2003. The numbering of the papers continued without interruption or change. ADBI was established in 1997 in Tokyo, Japan, to help build capacity, skills, and knowledge related to poverty reduction and other areas that support long-term growth and competitiveness in developing economies in Asia and the Pacific.

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