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Exploring Informal Social & Cultural Activism in Singapore: A Study on Local Ground-up Initiatives

dc.contributor.authorDanielle Hong
dc.contributor.editorLee Hock Guan
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-10T17:20:46Z
dc.date.available2018-09-10T17:20:46Z
dc.date.issued2017-12-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11540/8602
dc.description.abstractIn the permutations of its form, this paper defines collectives such as Geylang Adventures as a breed of informal social and cultural activism. Theoretically rooted in both new social movement analysis and urban studies, cultural activism uses “art and creative practices to disrupt commonly held assumptions and expectations, often by forging alternative spatial imaginaries or meanings” (Buser et al, 2013:2). Ideologically, the above collectives identify with the “commoning movement” which seeks to regain common wealth, both material and political through implementing participatory processes. Thematically, these collectives address issues of urbanisation, nationhood, sustainability and the building of communities. Within the uneasy government-civil society relationship, they posture themselves (in a spectrum) as both community partner to opposing government imperatives. The level of social capital each collective acquires leads to possibilities for expansion and collaboration. Functionally, these ground-up collectives differ from conventional non-profit ones in that they do not possess a legal structure; being neither a society, charitable trust or limited company. Some may choose to evolve into these types in order to gain credibility and remain sustainable. Ground up initiatives here are defined as; (i) self-initiated and organically formed to respond to a social issue or injustice, (ii) possessing no initial legal status4 and (iii) whose activities or programmes benefit a community as selected by the collective. This paper will also alternatively refer to them as informal collectives. There are an estimated hundred odd such informal collectives operating online and offline, self-organising events and outreach efforts to spearhead causes ranging from arts and heritage to social welfare. Their increasingly visible presence and reach on online platforms bears significance. Are they merely lifestyle initiatives touching upon community concerns, or are these ground-up initiatives part of a new wave of civil society groups engaging in a new form of social activism? This exploratory paper aims to examine this breed of informal social activism. It first explores the motivations for its genesis and growth. Secondly, it explores the constraints and opportunities facing the model.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherISEAS Yusof Ishak Institute
dc.titleExploring Informal Social & Cultural Activism in Singapore: A Study on Local Ground-up Initiatives
dc.typeWorking Papers
dc.subject.expertCivil Society Development
dc.subject.expertAgricultural And Rural Development
dc.subject.expertDevelopment In East Asia
dc.subject.expertInfrastructure Development Projects
dc.subject.expertInstitutional Development
dc.subject.expertMillennium Development Goals
dc.subject.expertPolicy Development
dc.subject.expertSocial Development Programs
dc.subject.expertSocial Development
dc.subject.expertBusiness Startups
dc.subject.expertNew Business Planning
dc.subject.adbRural planning
dc.subject.adbAid coordination
dc.subject.adbIndustrial projects
dc.subject.adbInfrastructure projects
dc.subject.adbNatural resources policy
dc.subject.adbEducational development
dc.subject.adbCultural Development
dc.subject.adbDevelopment Economics
dc.subject.adbDevelopment Issues
dc.subject.adbRural planning
dc.subject.adbAid coordination
dc.subject.adbIndustrial projects
dc.subject.adbInfrastructure projects
dc.subject.adbNatural resources policy
dc.subject.adbEducational development
dc.subject.adbDevelopment Issues
dc.subject.naturalCivil government
dc.subject.naturalCommon good
dc.subject.naturalFederal government
dc.subject.naturalDelivery of government services
dc.subject.naturalGovernment missions
dc.subject.naturalSocial participation
dc.subject.naturalPolitical participation
dc.subject.naturalCommunity banks
dc.subject.naturalBusiness planning
dc.subject.naturalInfrastructure
dc.subject.naturalSustainable urban development
dc.subject.naturalSocial contract
dc.subject.naturalCommunication in rural development
dc.subject.naturalCommunication in community development
dc.subject.naturalEconomic development projects
dc.subject.naturalDevelopment banks
dc.subject.naturalEconomic forecasting
dc.subject.naturalEnvironmental auditing
dc.subject.naturalCumulative effects assessment
dc.subject.naturalHuman rights and globalization
dc.subject.naturalGender-based analysis
dc.subject.naturalSex differences
dc.subject.naturalJob bias
dc.subject.naturalEqual employment opportunity
dc.subject.naturalFair employment practice
dc.subject.naturalSocial participation
dc.subject.naturalPolitical participation
dc.subject.naturalHuman rights and globalization
dc.subject.naturalGovernment
dc.subject.naturalPolitical development
dc.title.seriesISEAS Working Paper Series
dc.title.volumeIssue 2017 No. 02
dc.contributor.imprintISEAS Yusof Ishak Institute
oar.themeDevelopment
oar.themeGovernance
oar.themeLabor Migration
oar.adminregionSoutheast Asia Region
oar.countrySingapore
oar.identifierOAR-008180
oar.authorHong, Danielle
oar.importTRUE
oar.googlescholar.linkpresenttrue


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