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A Comparison of Gobal Governance Across Sectors: Gobal Health, Trade,and Multilateral Development Finance

dc.contributor.authorMatthias Helble
dc.contributor.authorZulfiqar Ali
dc.contributor.authorJera Lego
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-05T19:53:09Z
dc.date.available2018-03-05T19:53:09Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-28
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11540/7905
dc.description.abstractTo what extent do the World Health Organization, the World Trade Organization, and the World Bank remain central today and how much influence do they still wield in shaping the global agenda? While several studies have traced the development of various intergovernmental organizations (IGOs), charting their growth and influence in international affairs, and assessing their prospects, few if any have compared IGOs across various fields. This paper aims to fill this gap by taking a closer look at three different policy fields to better understand the current architecture of global governance, the centrality of IGOs, the role of new and other actors, as well as the strengths and weaknesses of this “new” architecture. The authors find that, first, the emergence of new private players has significantly eroded the centrality of IGOs such that the course of global governance in health, trade, and development finance has changed irreversibly. Second, regional arrangements have overtaken global ones and nonstate actors have assumed more prominent roles. Third, this multiplicity of powerful players has led to some positive outcomes but also greater inefficiencies and redundancies. Fourth, developed countries have been pivotal in eroding the centrality of IGOs, but developing countries are taking on a greater role in global governance. Fifth, the new architecture can be described as one of diversification in global health governance, fragmentation in global trade, and variation in multilateral development finance. Global governance in the 21st century is thus characterized by a proliferation of actors and a decentralization of authority, an erosion of IGO centrality accompanied by a greater role for nonstate actors, developing countries, and by increased regionalism. Depending on the sector of governance, its inherent aims, and the nature of the actors involved, the new architecture may be one of variation, fragmentation, or diversification. While this new architecture is complex and might possibly lead to inefficiencies and redundancies, it allows a greater number of actors to participate, making it more representative of the current world order and making it possible to mobilize more resources to promote development.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAsian Development Bank Institute
dc.titleA Comparison of Gobal Governance Across Sectors: Gobal Health, Trade,and Multilateral Development Finance
dc.typeWorking Papers
dc.subject.expertDevelopment assistance
dc.subject.expertADB
dc.subject.expertCurriculum development
dc.subject.expertDevelopment assistance
dc.subject.expertDevelopment aid
dc.subject.expertDevelopment indicators
dc.subject.expertDevelopment potential
dc.subject.expertDevelopment models
dc.subject.expertProject appraisal
dc.subject.expertPerformance appraisal
dc.subject.expertRegional development bank
dc.subject.expertTrade development
dc.subject.expertImport volume
dc.subject.expertExport volume
dc.subject.adbAsian Development Bank
dc.subject.adbDevelopment
dc.subject.adbTrade
dc.subject.adbDevelopment Goals
dc.subject.adbSkills Development
dc.subject.adbSustainable Development
dc.subject.adbTrade Flows
dc.subject.adbTrade And Development
dc.subject.adbFood Security And Trade
dc.subject.adbTrade Volume
dc.subject.adbTrade Potential
dc.subject.adbTrade Flows
dc.subject.adbExternal Trade
dc.subject.adbIndustrial policy
dc.subject.adbNew technology
dc.subject.adbInnovations
dc.subject.adbIndustry
dc.subject.adbExport policy
dc.subject.adbImport policy
dc.subject.naturalCapital
dc.subject.naturalBusiness
dc.subject.naturalCommunication in rural development
dc.subject.naturalSocial participation
dc.subject.naturalOccupational training
dc.subject.naturalPartnership
dc.subject.naturalJoint venture
dc.subject.naturalSystem analysis
dc.subject.naturalLabor and globalization
dc.subject.naturalLabor policy
dc.subject.naturalRegional trading blocs
dc.subject.naturalForeign trade and employment
dc.subject.naturalDeveloping countries
dc.subject.naturalIndustrial priorities
dc.subject.naturalTechnological innovation
dc.subject.naturalTechnology transfer
dc.subject.naturalForeign trade regulation
dc.subject.naturalIndustrial relations
dc.title.seriesADBI Working Paper Series
dc.title.volumeNo. 806
dc.contributor.imprintAsian Development Bank Institute
oar.themeDevelopment
oar.themeTrade
oar.adminregionAsia and the Pacific Region
oar.countryBangladesh
oar.countryBhutan
oar.countryIndia
oar.countryMaldives
oar.countryNepal
oar.countrySri Lanka
oar.countryBrunei Darussalam
oar.countryCambodia
oar.countryIndonesia
oar.countryLao People's Democratic
oar.countryMalaysia
oar.countryMyanmar
oar.countryPhilippines
oar.countrySingapore
oar.countryThailand
oar.countryViet Nam
oar.countryCook Islands
oar.countryFiji Islands
oar.countryKiribati
oar.countryMarshall Islands
oar.countryFederated States of Micronesia
oar.countryNauru
oar.countryPalau
oar.countryPapua New Guinea
oar.countrySamoa
oar.countrySolomon Islands
oar.countryTimor-Leste
oar.countryTonga
oar.countryTuvalu
oar.countryVanuatu
oar.countryAfghanistan
oar.countryArmenia
oar.countryAzerbaijan
oar.countryGeorgia
oar.countryKazakhstan
oar.countryKyrgyz Republic
oar.countryPakistan
oar.countryTajikistan
oar.countryTurkmenistan
oar.countryUzbekistan
oar.countryPeople's Republic of China
oar.countryHong Kong
oar.countryChina
oar.countryRepublic of Korea
oar.countryMongolia
oar.countryTaipei,China
oar.identifierOAR-007500
oar.authorHelble, Matthias
oar.authorAli, Zulfiqar
oar.authorLego, Jera
oar.importTRUE
oar.googlescholar.linkpresenttrue


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    The Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) Working Paper series is a continuation of the formerly named Discussion Paper series which began in January 2003. The numbering of the papers continued without interruption or change. ADBI was established in 1997 in Tokyo, Japan, to help build capacity, skills, and knowledge related to poverty reduction and other areas that support long-term growth and competitiveness in developing economies in Asia and the Pacific.

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