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Lessons for Asia from Europe's History with Banking Integration

dc.contributor.authorDouglas J. Elliott
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-10T10:17:29Z
dc.date.available2015-04-10T10:17:29Z
dc.date.issued2014-02-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11540/3959
dc.description.abstractAs Asia considers greater harmonization and integration of its financial systems, it would be well-advised to consider the experience of Europe, particularly the eurozone. There are many lessons to be drawn from Europe about how to implement such integration, mostly negative. It is particularly evident that moving to a currency union had major unanticipated consequences for the ability to manage integration of financial systems within the eurozone. Monetary union sharply reduced the ability of the member states of the eurozone to manage their macroeconomic and macroprudential policies to preserve financial stability. Even setting aside these additional problems created by monetary union, Europe suffered substantial harm from integrating its financial systems so closely in many ways, while simultaneously establishing only very weak coordinating mechanisms among their national financial supervisors. It was also a mistake to forbid the European Central Bank from operating formally as a lender of last resort in a financial crisis. Europe’s experiences should not dissuade Asia from seeking appropriate further harmonization and integration. However, they do argue strongly for Asia to take the kind of careful, step-by-step, long-term approach for which many of the countries within Asia are well known. In particular, Asia should only move forward to the extent that it is willing to take the necessary steps toward common supervisory approaches, information sharing, and cooperation in crises. Trying to have the benefits of integration without the responsibilities would be a recipe for future disaster.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAsian Development Bank
dc.rightsCC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
dc.titleLessons for Asia from Europe's History with Banking Integration
dc.typeWorking Papers
dc.subject.expertMacroeconomic
dc.subject.expertMacroeconomic Analysis
dc.subject.expertMacroeconomic Framework
dc.subject.expertMacroeconomic Models
dc.subject.expertMacroeconomic Performance
dc.subject.expertMacroeconomic Planning
dc.subject.expertMacroeconomic Policies
dc.subject.expertMacroeconomic Reform
dc.subject.expertMacroeconomic Stabilization
dc.subject.adbSocial condition
dc.subject.adbEconomic dependence
dc.subject.adbEconomic assistance
dc.subject.adbInternational monetary relations
dc.subject.adbInternational monetary relations
dc.subject.adbInternational trade
dc.subject.adbNational accounting
dc.subject.adbMarket
dc.subject.naturalExchange
dc.subject.naturalComparative economics
dc.subject.naturalIndex number
dc.subject.naturalMonetary policy
dc.subject.naturalValue analysis
dc.subject.naturalAdjustment cost
dc.subject.naturalTransaction cost
dc.subject.naturalConditionality
dc.subject.naturalInternational relations
dc.title.seriesADBI Working Paper Series
dc.title.volume462
dc.contributor.imprintAsian Development Bank
oar.themeEconomics
oar.adminregionAsia and the Pacific Region
oar.countryBangladesh
oar.countryBhutan
oar.countryIndia
oar.countryMaldives
oar.countryNepal
oar.countrySri Lanka
oar.countryBrunei Darussalam
oar.countryCambodia
oar.countryIndonesia
oar.countryLao People's Democratic
oar.countryMalaysia
oar.countryMyanmar
oar.countryPhilippines
oar.countrySingapore
oar.countryThailand
oar.countryViet Nam
oar.countryCook Islands
oar.countryFiji Islands
oar.countryKiribati
oar.countryMarshall Islands
oar.countryFederated States of Micronesia
oar.countryNauru
oar.countryPalau
oar.countryPapua New Guinea
oar.countrySamoa
oar.countrySolomon Islands
oar.countryTimor-Leste
oar.countryTonga
oar.countryTuvalu
oar.countryVanuatu
oar.countryAfghanistan
oar.countryArmenia
oar.countryAzerbaijan
oar.countryGeorgia
oar.countryKazakhstan
oar.countryKyrgyz Republic
oar.countryPakistan
oar.countryTajikistan
oar.countryTurkmenistan
oar.countryUzbekistan
oar.countryPeople's Republic of China
oar.countryHong Kong
oar.countryChina
oar.countryRepublic of Korea
oar.countryMongolia
oar.countryTaipei,China
oar.identifierOAR-004020
oar.authorElliott, Douglas J.
oar.importtrue
oar.googlescholar.linkpresenttrue


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  • ADBI Working Papers
    The Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) Working Paper series is a continuation of the formerly named Discussion Paper series which began in January 2003. The numbering of the papers continued without interruption or change. ADBI was established in 1997 in Tokyo, Japan, to help build capacity, skills, and knowledge related to poverty reduction and other areas that support long-term growth and competitiveness in developing economies in Asia and the Pacific.

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