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Financial Regulatory Harmonization in East Asia: Balancing Domestic and International Pressures for Corporate Governance Reforms

dc.contributor.authorRichard W. Carney
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-10T10:17:07Z
dc.date.available2015-04-10T10:17:07Z
dc.date.issued2010-03-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11540/3857
dc.description.abstractIs the harmonization of financial regulatory regimes possible in East Asia? Focusing on corporate governance, which many see as a critical part of the 1997 Asian financial crisis, and which is also seen as unresponsive to calls for change, this paper argues that such harmonization is possible, but that it will not be according to the “best practices” advocated by the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, and other international organizations. At present, actors generally feign compliance with these international rules and standards. But this creates potential long-term problems by allowing distortions to persist and accumulate over time. By identifying the key actors that determine regulatory outcomes, this paper points to an alternative regulatory framework that would be adopted more comprehensively. This alternative framework is a compromise between the “best practices” advocated by international organizations, and the domestic political realities of East Asia.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAsian Development Bank
dc.rightsCC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
dc.titleFinancial Regulatory Harmonization in East Asia: Balancing Domestic and International Pressures for Corporate Governance Reforms
dc.typeWorking Papers
dc.subject.expertRegional Development Finance
dc.subject.expertPublic Scrutiny of City Finances
dc.subject.expertNon-Bank Financial Institutions
dc.subject.expertLocal Government Finance
dc.subject.expertGovernment Financial Institutions
dc.subject.expertForeign and Domestic Financing
dc.subject.expertFinancial Risk Management
dc.subject.expertAssessing Corporate Governance
dc.subject.expertGood Governance
dc.subject.expertGovernance Approach
dc.subject.adbPublic Accounting
dc.subject.adbBusiness Financing
dc.subject.adbSubsidies
dc.subject.adbSocial Equity
dc.subject.adbEconomic Equity
dc.subject.adbProject Risks
dc.subject.adbProject Impact
dc.subject.adbPublic Administration
dc.subject.adbCorporations
dc.subject.naturalTaxing power
dc.subject.naturalTax administration and procedure
dc.subject.naturalTax policy
dc.subject.naturalEffect of taxation on labor supply
dc.subject.naturalDecentralization in government
dc.subject.naturalCommunity power
dc.subject.naturalCorporate divestment
dc.subject.naturalCivil government
dc.subject.naturalDelegation of powers
dc.subject.naturalEquality
dc.subject.naturalNeighborhood government
dc.subject.naturalSubnational governments
dc.subject.naturalDelivery of government services
dc.title.seriesADBI Working Paper Series
dc.title.volume269
dc.contributor.imprintAsian Development Bank
oar.themeFinance
oar.themeGovernance
oar.adminregionEast Asia Region
oar.countryPeople's Republic of China
oar.countryHong Kong
oar.countryChina
oar.countryRepublic of Korea
oar.countryMongolia
oar.countryTaipei,China
oar.identifierOAR-004118
oar.authorCarney, Richard W.
oar.importtrue
oar.googlescholar.linkpresenttrue


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  • ADBI Working Papers
    The Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) Working Paper series is a continuation of the formerly named Discussion Paper series which began in January 2003. The numbering of the papers continued without interruption or change. ADBI was established in 1997 in Tokyo, Japan, to help build capacity, skills, and knowledge related to poverty reduction and other areas that support long-term growth and competitiveness in developing economies in Asia and the Pacific.

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