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When Globalization Meets Urbanization: Labor Market Reform, Income Inequality, and Economic Growth in the People’s Republic of China

dc.contributor.authorMing Lu
dc.contributor.authorHong Gao
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-10T10:16:45Z
dc.date.available2015-04-10T10:16:45Z
dc.date.issued2009-11-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11540/3750
dc.description.abstractThe development path that the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has been following during the past thirty years has led to both internal and external economic imbalances, and is now greatly challenged by the global crisis. This unbalanced growth path was primarily a result of the PRC’s labor market reform which took the years of the mid-1990s as its turning point. Before the mid-1990s, the scale of rural-to-urban migration was limited, but it has grown dramatically since then. 1996 also saw drastic employment restructuring in urban areas of the PRC. Labor market reform, accompanied by the foreign exchange system reform in 1994, confirmed the PRC’s comparative advantage of low labor cost, and therefore further increased the PRC’s reliance on exports. However, the increased income disparity that resulted from the labor market reform may jeopardize sustainable growth if no adjustment is made. To sustain the high economic growth, especially in face of the current crisis, the PRC needs to adjust its reform and development strategies to promote income equality.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAsian Development Bank
dc.rightsCC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
dc.titleWhen Globalization Meets Urbanization: Labor Market Reform, Income Inequality, and Economic Growth in the People’s Republic of China
dc.typeWorking Papers
dc.subject.expertGender
dc.subject.expertGender Bias
dc.subject.expertGender Differences
dc.subject.expertGender Discrimination
dc.subject.expertGender Equality
dc.subject.expertGender Gaps
dc.subject.expertGender Inequality
dc.subject.expertGender Issues
dc.subject.expertGender Relations
dc.subject.expertGender Roles
dc.subject.adbComparative Analysis
dc.subject.adbSocial Research
dc.subject.adbSex Discrimination
dc.subject.adbEmployment Discrimination
dc.subject.adbWomen's Rights
dc.subject.adbEqual Opportunity
dc.subject.adbEqual Pay
dc.subject.adbFeminism
dc.subject.adbMen's Role
dc.subject.adbWomen's Role
dc.subject.naturalGender-based analysis
dc.subject.naturalSex differences
dc.subject.naturalJob bias
dc.subject.naturalEqual employment opportunity
dc.subject.naturalFair employment practice
dc.subject.naturalJob discrimination
dc.subject.naturalAffirmative action programs
dc.subject.naturalSex dicrimination against women
dc.subject.naturalPay equity
dc.subject.naturalSexism
dc.subject.naturalEqual rights amendment
dc.subject.naturalEmancipation of women
dc.subject.naturalEqual rights
dc.subject.naturalWomen's movements
dc.title.seriesADBI Working Paper Series
dc.title.volume162
dc.contributor.imprintAsian Development Bank
oar.themeGender
oar.themeLabor Migration
oar.adminregionEast Asia Region
oar.countryPeople's Republic of China
oar.identifierOAR-004227
oar.authorLu, Ming
oar.authorGao, Hong
oar.importtrue
oar.googlescholar.linkpresenttrue


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  • ADBI Working Papers
    The Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) Working Paper series is a continuation of the formerly named Discussion Paper series which began in January 2003. The numbering of the papers continued without interruption or change. ADBI was established in 1997 in Tokyo, Japan, to help build capacity, skills, and knowledge related to poverty reduction and other areas that support long-term growth and competitiveness in developing economies in Asia and the Pacific.

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