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Managing Capital Flows: The Case of India

dc.contributor.authorAjay Shah
dc.contributor.authorIla Patnaik
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-10T10:16:31Z
dc.date.available2015-04-10T10:16:31Z
dc.date.issued2008-05-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11540/3687
dc.description.abstractFrom the early 1990s, India embarked on easing capital controls. Liberalization emphasized openness towards equity flows, both FDI and portfolio flows. In particular, there are few barriers in the face of portfolio equity flows. In recent years, a massive increase in the value of foreign ownership of Indian equities has come about, largely reflecting improvements in the size, liquidity and corporate governance of Indian firms. While the system of capital controls appears formidable, the de facto openness on the ground is greater than is apparent, particularly because of the substantial enlargement of the current account. These changes to capital account openness were not accompanied by commensurate monetary policy reform. The monetary policy regime has consisted essentially of a pegged exchange rate to the US dollar throughout. Increasing openness on the capital account, coupled with exchange rate pegging, has led to a substantial loss of monetary policy autonomy. The logical way forward now consists of bringing the de jure capital controls up-to-date with the de facto convertibility, and embarking on reforms of the monetary policy framework so as to shift the focus of monetary policy away from the exchange rate to domestic inflation.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAsian Development Bank
dc.rightsCC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
dc.titleManaging Capital Flows: The Case of India
dc.typeWorking Papers
dc.subject.expertRegional Development Finance
dc.subject.expertPublic Scrutiny of City Finances
dc.subject.expertNon-Bank Financial Institutions
dc.subject.expertLocal Government Finance
dc.subject.expertGovernment Financial Institutions
dc.subject.expertForeign and Domestic Financing
dc.subject.expertFinancial Risk Management
dc.subject.expertAssessing Corporate Governance
dc.subject.expertGood Governance
dc.subject.expertGovernance Approach
dc.subject.adbPublic Accounting
dc.subject.adbBusiness Financing
dc.subject.adbSubsidies
dc.subject.adbSocial Equity
dc.subject.adbEconomic Equity
dc.subject.adbProject Risks
dc.subject.adbProject Impact
dc.subject.adbPublic Administration
dc.subject.adbCorporations
dc.subject.naturalInvestment Requirements
dc.subject.naturalBanks
dc.subject.natural|Taxing power
dc.subject.naturalTax administration and procedure
dc.subject.naturalTax policy
dc.subject.naturalEffect of taxation on labor supply
dc.subject.naturalDecentralization in government
dc.subject.naturalCommunity power
dc.subject.naturalCorporate divestment
dc.subject.naturalCivil government
dc.subject.naturalDelegation of powers
dc.subject.naturalEquality
dc.subject.naturalNeighborhood government
dc.subject.naturalSubnational governments
dc.subject.naturalDelivery of government services
dc.title.seriesADBI Working Paper Series
dc.title.volume98
dc.contributor.imprintAsian Development Bank
oar.themeFinance
oar.themeGovernance
oar.adminregionSouth Asia Region
oar.countryIndia
oar.identifierOAR-004291
oar.authorShah, Ajay
oar.authorPatnaik, Ila
oar.importtrue
oar.googlescholar.linkpresenttrue


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  • ADBI Working Papers
    The Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) Working Paper series is a continuation of the formerly named Discussion Paper series which began in January 2003. The numbering of the papers continued without interruption or change. ADBI was established in 1997 in Tokyo, Japan, to help build capacity, skills, and knowledge related to poverty reduction and other areas that support long-term growth and competitiveness in developing economies in Asia and the Pacific.

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