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Global Partnership in Poverty Reduction: Contract Farming and Regional Cooperation

dc.contributor.authorSununtar Setboonsarng
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-10T10:16:28Z
dc.date.available2015-04-10T10:16:28Z
dc.date.issued2008-02-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11540/3677
dc.description.abstractWith globalization, market liberalization, and the rapid development of rural infrastructure, new market opportunities for high-value crops and livestock production are expanding in both developed and developing countries. This has translated into increased use of contract farming to establish market linkages for the poor in developing countries. In poor areas where smallholder subsistence production is the norm and where infrastructure and institutions to facilitate market exchange are not well established, contract farming is providing farmers with the assured sale of their crops and agro-business firms with a steady supply of agricultural output required by the market. In many instances, agro-business firms provide additional provisions, including technical support, improved farm inputs, credit, product accreditation, and assistance in the formulation of farmers’ groups. Consequently, poor farmers are able to transform from traditional cultivation and management practices to market-oriented commercial production, resulting in employment generation, income growth, and greater security. This paper reviews the pros and cons of contract farming from the point of view of different stakeholders, e.g., firms, farmers, government, and donors. In particular, this work examines contract farming in the Lao PDR and Cambodia and points to contract farming of organic crops as a promising option for poor farmers as the practice is consistent with traditional practices while associated with lower health and environmental risks. While the development of market linkages for farmers is traditionally viewed as a public sector responsibility, the establishment of necessary agro-services for a large number of small, unorganized farmers requires a tremendous amount of public sector resources. Given the limited availability of government and donor resources, private sector endeavors that serve to generate pro-poor growth may be the key to poverty alleviation.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAsian Development Bank
dc.rightsCC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
dc.titleGlobal Partnership in Poverty Reduction: Contract Farming and Regional Cooperation
dc.typeWorking Papers
dc.subject.expertCommercial agriculture
dc.subject.expertAgriculture
dc.subject.expertSustainable agriculture
dc.subject.expertTrade Volume
dc.subject.expertAgricultural Trade
dc.subject.expertFood Security And Trade
dc.subject.expertRegional Trade Agreements
dc.subject.adbAgroindustry
dc.subject.adbAgricultural trade
dc.subject.adbCommercial farming
dc.subject.adbAgroindustry
dc.subject.adbSustainable development
dc.subject.adbExport volume
dc.subject.adbExport Development
dc.subject.adbAccess to markets
dc.subject.adbAgricultural market
dc.subject.adbAgricultural economy
dc.subject.adbDistribution
dc.subject.naturalAgricultural diversification
dc.subject.naturalAgricultural resource
dc.subject.naturalFarm produce
dc.subject.naturalLand capability for agriculture
dc.subject.naturalFood Supply
dc.subject.naturalRural land use
dc.subject.naturalTechnological innovations
dc.subject.naturalAgricultural innovations
dc.subject.naturalFarm supply industry
dc.subject.naturalNatural resource
dc.subject.naturalAdaptive natural resource management
dc.subject.naturalProduce trade
dc.subject.naturalPoor
dc.subject.naturalPrice Indexes
dc.subject.naturalIntergrated rural development
dc.subject.naturalCost and standard of living
dc.subject.naturalPopulation
dc.subject.naturalCrop improvement
dc.subject.naturalRice farming
dc.subject.naturalCrop
dc.subject.naturalFood industry
dc.subject.naturalPerishable goods
dc.title.seriesADBI Working Paper Series
dc.title.volume89
dc.contributor.imprintAsian Development Bank
oar.themeAgriculture
oar.themeTrade
oar.adminregionAsia and the Pacific Region
oar.countryBangladesh
oar.countryBhutan
oar.countryIndia
oar.countryMaldives
oar.countryNepal
oar.countrySri Lanka
oar.countryBrunei Darussalam
oar.countryCambodia
oar.countryIndonesia
oar.countryLao People's Democratic
oar.countryMalaysia
oar.countryMyanmar
oar.countryPhilippines
oar.countrySingapore
oar.countryThailand
oar.countryViet Nam
oar.countryCook Islands
oar.countryFiji Islands
oar.countryKiribati
oar.countryMarshall Islands
oar.countryFederated States of Micronesia
oar.countryNauru
oar.countryPalau
oar.countryPapua New Guinea
oar.countrySamoa
oar.countrySolomon Islands
oar.countryTimor-Leste
oar.countryTonga
oar.countryTuvalu
oar.countryVanuatu
oar.countryAfghanistan
oar.countryArmenia
oar.countryAzerbaijan
oar.countryGeorgia
oar.countryKazakhstan
oar.countryKyrgyz Republic
oar.countryPakistan
oar.countryTajikistan
oar.countryTurkmenistan
oar.countryUzbekistan
oar.countryPeople's Republic of China
oar.countryHong Kong
oar.countryChina
oar.countryRepublic of Korea
oar.countryMongolia
oar.countryTaipei,China
oar.identifierOAR-004301
oar.authorSetboonsarng, Sununtar
oar.importtrue
oar.googlescholar.linkpresenttrue


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  • ADBI Working Papers
    The Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) Working Paper series is a continuation of the formerly named Discussion Paper series which began in January 2003. The numbering of the papers continued without interruption or change. ADBI was established in 1997 in Tokyo, Japan, to help build capacity, skills, and knowledge related to poverty reduction and other areas that support long-term growth and competitiveness in developing economies in Asia and the Pacific.

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