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Export Growth and Industrial Policy: Lessons from the East Asian Miracle Experience

dc.contributor.authorJohn Weiss
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-10T10:16:11Z
dc.date.available2015-04-10T10:16:11Z
dc.date.issued2005-02-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11540/3614
dc.description.abstractThe lessons from the high growth or ‘Miracle’ experience of the newly industrialized economies (NIEs) have been discussed extensively. This paper focuses on a particular and controversial aspect of this story – role of export growth and industrial policy – with the latter defined broadly to cover a range of interventions to change the structure and raise the growth of exports. It asks what are the lessons for today’s policy-makers in the East Asian region from this experience. The international environment is now very different from the early 1960’s, when the rapid growth of manufactured exports from the first tier NIEs started to arrive on world markets. Forces of globalization of both trade and capital flows are now much stronger, intra-regional trade is now far more significant and transnational firms have now established elaborate production networks, both globally and within the region. The rules and dispute procedures governing international trade have been strengthened by the emergence of the World Trade Organization (WTO). Also ideas relating to economic policy and the most effective means of stimulating economic development are now very different with a greater awareness of the potential costs of interventions to control or over-ride markets. Nonetheless the paper suggests there are some policy lessons from this look at recent economic history, which are different for economies at different stages of development.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAsian Development Bank
dc.rightsCC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
dc.titleExport Growth and Industrial Policy: Lessons from the East Asian Miracle Experience
dc.typeWorking Papers
dc.subject.expertLevels Of Education
dc.subject.expertForeign Trade Policy
dc.subject.expertTrade Negotiations
dc.subject.adbEconomics of education
dc.subject.adbEconomic integration
dc.subject.adbTrade data interchange
dc.subject.naturalEducational innovations
dc.subject.naturalGlobal trade
dc.subject.naturalMass media and business
dc.title.seriesADBI Working Paper Series
dc.title.volume26
dc.contributor.imprintAsian Development Bank
oar.themeEducation
oar.themeTrade
oar.adminregionAsia and the Pacific Region
oar.countryBangladesh
oar.countryBhutan
oar.countryIndia
oar.countryMaldives
oar.countryNepal
oar.countrySri Lanka
oar.countryBrunei Darussalam
oar.countryCambodia
oar.countryIndonesia
oar.countryLao People's Democratic
oar.countryMalaysia
oar.countryMyanmar
oar.countryPhilippines
oar.countrySingapore
oar.countryThailand
oar.countryViet Nam
oar.countryCook Islands
oar.countryFiji Islands
oar.countryKiribati
oar.countryMarshall Islands
oar.countryFederated States of Micronesia
oar.countryNauru
oar.countryPalau
oar.countryPapua New Guinea
oar.countrySamoa
oar.countrySolomon Islands
oar.countryTimor-Leste
oar.countryTonga
oar.countryTuvalu
oar.countryVanuatu
oar.countryAfghanistan
oar.countryArmenia
oar.countryAzerbaijan
oar.countryGeorgia
oar.countryKazakhstan
oar.countryKyrgyz Republic
oar.countryPakistan
oar.countryTajikistan
oar.countryTurkmenistan
oar.countryUzbekistan
oar.countryPeople's Republic of China
oar.countryHong Kong
oar.countryChina
oar.countryRepublic of Korea
oar.countryMongolia
oar.countryTaipei,China
oar.identifierOAR-004364
oar.authorWeiss, John
oar.importtrue
oar.googlescholar.linkpresenttrue


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  • ADBI Working Papers
    The Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) Working Paper series is a continuation of the formerly named Discussion Paper series which began in January 2003. The numbering of the papers continued without interruption or change. ADBI was established in 1997 in Tokyo, Japan, to help build capacity, skills, and knowledge related to poverty reduction and other areas that support long-term growth and competitiveness in developing economies in Asia and the Pacific.

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