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Shaping New Regionalism in the Pacific Islands: Back to the Future?

dc.contributor.authorSatish Chand
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-30T14:45:16Z
dc.date.available2015-01-30T14:45:16Z
dc.date.issued2010-10-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11540/1941
dc.description.abstractThe many small sovereign states and multiple shades of sovereignty that exist across the present-day Pacific Island region are largely the product of the region‘s colonial history. Yet, the story of regionalism among the Pacific Islands began in pre-colonial times. This history, in turn, has been shaped by the region‘s geography and natural resource endowments. The region was colonized after other parts of the world because of its physical isolation and the difficulties of access from Western Europe. Postcolonization, the region was partitioned through contests for space among powers from inside and outside the region, and in response to competition among Protestant and Catholic churches seeking to expand their respective congregations. The security concerns and strategic interests of the major powers have shaped regionalism and are likely to remain important factors for the foreseeable future. Trade integration, however, is not a significant factor contributing to regionalism today. Thus, Pacific Island countries may want to pursue trade liberalization unilaterally.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAsian Development Bank
dc.rightsCC BY 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo
dc.titleShaping New Regionalism in the Pacific Islands: Back to the Future?
dc.typeWorking Papers
dc.subject.expertClimate
dc.subject.expertClimate change
dc.subject.expertClimate impacts assessment
dc.subject.expertGlobal climate change
dc.subject.expertRural Development
dc.subject.expertRural Development Projects
dc.subject.expertRural Development Research
dc.subject.adbClimatic change
dc.subject.adbClimatic influence
dc.subject.adbClimatology
dc.subject.adbInvestment bank
dc.subject.adbInvestment policy
dc.subject.adbRural areas
dc.subject.adbRural economy
dc.subject.adbRural planning
dc.subject.adbRural poverty
dc.subject.adbDevelopment potential
dc.subject.naturalClimatic factor
dc.subject.naturalSoils and climate
dc.subject.naturalDynamic climatology
dc.subject.naturalClimate change mitigation
dc.subject.naturalCommunication in rural development
dc.subject.naturalRural enterprise zones
dc.subject.naturalRural manpower policy
dc.subject.naturalEnvironment impact analysis
dc.subject.naturalCity planning
dc.subject.naturalUrban climatology
dc.subject.naturalBank investment
dc.subject.naturalCapital investment
dc.subject.naturalInvestment banking
dc.subject.naturalVenture capital
dc.title.seriesADB Working Paper Series on Regional Economic Integration
dc.title.volumeNo. 61
dc.contributor.imprintAsian Development Bank
oar.themeClimate
oar.themeDevelopment
oar.themeLabor Migration
oar.adminregionPacific Region
oar.countryCook Islands
oar.countryFiji
oar.countryKiribati
oar.countryMarshall Islands
oar.countryMicronesia, Federated States of
oar.countryNauru
oar.countryPalau
oar.countryPapua New Guinea
oar.countrySamoa
oar.countrySolomon Islands
oar.countryTimor-Leste
oar.countryTonga
oar.countryTuvalu
oar.countryVanuatu
oar.identifierOAR-001267
oar.authorChand, Satish
oar.importtrue
oar.googlescholar.linkpresenttrue


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  • Regional Economic Integration Working Paper Series
    The Asian Development Bank Working Paper Series on Regional Economic Integration focuses on topics relating to regional cooperation and integration in the areas of infrastructure and software, trade and investment, money and finance, and regional public goods. The series is a quick-disseminating, informal publication that seeks to provide information, generate discussion, and elicit comments.

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