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Lifestyle Choices and Societal Behavior Changes as Local Climate Strategy

dc.contributor.authorBrahmanand Mohanty
dc.contributor.authorMartin Scherfler
dc.contributor.authorVikram Devatha
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-24T13:12:26Z
dc.date.available2015-01-24T13:12:26Z
dc.date.issued2012-11-30
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11540/1159
dc.description.abstract"The Asia-Pacific region is witnessing rapid economic growth. Along with rising incomes, the lifestyles of the large middle class are moving quickly towards a buy-and-discard consumer model that involves carbon-intensive products and services. These increase dependency on the Earth’s finite natural resources and simultaneously produces waste, putting a significant strain on the environment. Such lifestyles, coupled with scarce resources and frequent natural hazards associated with climate change, pose serious threats to the future of the planet. Developed countries with high footprint per capita are under pressure to adjust their lifestyles that respect the Earths’ carrying capacity. As far as countries in the Asia and Pacific region are concerned, mere technological solutions such as improving production efficiency will not be adequate to address climate change; a paradigm shift to more resource-efficient and low-carbon lifestyles, that promote inclusive and efficient consumption is the need of the hour. Several examples of good practices and community initiatives can be found around the world, but these have yet to be brought to the mainstream in order to achieve tangible results. Governments and policy makers in the Asia-Pacific can join hands with businesses and civil society to accelerate this transition—from a consumption-oriented economic paradigm, to a more sustainable way of production and consumption. This paper attempts to identify lifestyle changes at the individual level, and behavioral changes at the community level that could offer high carbon abatement potential. It also provides some good practices of public policies and policy recommendations that can be pivotal in making a business case of low-carbon and eco-efficient lifestyles, strengthening collective awareness, and influencing public decision-making in developing countries in Asia."
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAsian Development Bank Institute
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND 3.0 IGO
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/igo/
dc.titleLifestyle Choices and Societal Behavior Changes as Local Climate Strategy
dc.typeWorking Papers
dc.subject.expertUrbanization
dc.subject.expertUrban Services
dc.subject.expertUrban Projects
dc.subject.expertUrban Problems
dc.subject.expertUrban Poverty
dc.subject.expertUrban Policy
dc.subject.expertUrban Planning
dc.subject.expertUrban Infrastructure
dc.subject.expertUrban Health
dc.subject.expertUrban Government
dc.subject.expertUrban Economic Development
dc.subject.expertUrban Development Finance
dc.subject.expertUrban Development
dc.subject.expertUrban Conditions
dc.subject.expertUrban Communities
dc.subject.expertUrban Population
dc.subject.expertEnvironmental Sustainability
dc.subject.adbUrban Plans
dc.subject.adbUrbanism
dc.subject.adbUrban agriculture
dc.subject.adbEconomic Development
dc.subject.adbRural Urban Migration
dc.subject.adbCities
dc.subject.adbInstitutional Framework
dc.subject.adbBusiness Management
dc.subject.adbCorporate Restructuring|Emission Control
dc.subject.adbPollution Control
dc.subject.naturalLocal government
dc.subject.naturalUrban renewal
dc.subject.naturalUrban housing
dc.subject.naturalUrban sociology
dc.subject.naturalTransit systems
dc.subject.naturalRapid transit
dc.subject.naturalPublic transit
dc.subject.naturalMass transit
dc.subject.naturalPersonnel management
dc.subject.naturalCorporate reorganizations
dc.subject.naturalIntergovernmental cooperation
dc.subject.naturalCarbon dioxide mitigation
dc.subject.naturalEcological risk assessment
dc.title.seriesADBI Working Paper Series
dc.title.volumeNo. 398
dc.contributor.imprintAsian Development Bank Institute
oar.themeUrban
oar.themeEnvironment
oar.themeLabor Migration
oar.adminregionAsia and the Pacific Region
oar.countryBangladesh
oar.countryBhutan
oar.countryIndia
oar.countryMaldives
oar.countryNepal
oar.countrySri Lanka
oar.countryBrunei Darussalam
oar.countryCambodia
oar.countryIndonesia
oar.countryLao People's Democratic Republic
oar.countryMalaysia
oar.countryMyanmar
oar.countryPhilippines
oar.countrySingapore
oar.countryThailand
oar.countryViet Nam
oar.countryCook Islands
oar.countryFiji
oar.countryKiribati
oar.countryMarshall Islands
oar.countryMicronesia, Federated States of
oar.countryNauru
oar.countryPalau
oar.countryPapua New Guinea
oar.countrySamoa
oar.countrySolomon Islands
oar.countryTimor-Leste
oar.countryTonga
oar.countryTuvalu
oar.countryVanuatu
oar.countryAfghanistan
oar.countryArmenia
oar.countryAzerbaijan
oar.countryGeorgia
oar.countryKazakhstan
oar.countryKyrgyz Republic
oar.countryPakistan
oar.countryTajikistan
oar.countryTurkmenistan
oar.countryUzbekistan
oar.countryChina, People’s Republic of
oar.countryHong Kong, China
oar.countryChina, People’s Republic of
oar.countryRepublic of Korea
oar.countryMongolia
oar.countryTaipei,China
oar.dep.sourceADBI
oar.identifierOAR-002284
oar.authorMohanty, Brahmanand
oar.authorScherfler, Martin
oar.authorDevatha, Vikram
oar.importtrue
oar.googlescholar.linkpresenttrue


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  • ADBI Working Papers
    The Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) Working Paper series is a continuation of the formerly named Discussion Paper series which began in January 2003. The numbering of the papers continued without interruption or change. ADBI was established in 1997 in Tokyo, Japan, to help build capacity, skills, and knowledge related to poverty reduction and other areas that support long-term growth and competitiveness in developing economies in Asia and the Pacific.

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